Part Four Feedback Reflection

Overall:

My tutor noticed effort and attention to detail and said it will pay off.

As usual there were some great tips in my feedback, here my tutor recommended to help capture perspective of circular object or a circular space to position my objects linear, the visible difference in sizes will help.

My tutor suggested to work / concentrate on one drawing, rather that doing too many different ones. ‘Reworking can produce more textured results.’

Research:

My tutor noticed the work I put in research of movement in interiors. I researched various examples and noticed ‘different types of movement’. I also tried to apply to apply the knowledge gained through my research to my own work.

Doing additional research (as I did with perspective lines on my walks) will improve my skills in observing spaces.

Creativity:

My tutor said that I continue to develop my creativity and it is showing more, especially in abstract drawing of still life. She recommended the group drawing sessions. I should also remember that this type of drawing does not have to represent exact image of my object. I need to trust my hand more and draw on larger sheet of paper.

Even though I had a good start at photoshop I should try and play more with images in photoshop, such as layering and adding background, it will make the abstract image look more ‘real’.

My tutor said my perspective drawing attempts were a good start, I received a helpful tip to place vanishing points outside of my paper.

Communication & Presentation:

My tutor said that drawing movement and people is difficult, but I gave it a good go, trying different approaches.

I should practice drawing people using freeze-frame on TV and do quick stick drawings, showing angles and lengths of limbs. Also including, wrists, elbows and knees will help express the movement and make the figures look right.

My ways of expressing movement using lines, spirals, colour, and gradients were successful.

I am pleased to know that navigating my learning log is easy and that the layout is clear.

Critical reflection:

My tutor said that my personal reflection is detailed, and I explain my thoughts and processes is an easy to understand way.

She also noted that ‘I can think across the tasks and make connections in my work which show development in my understanding.’

I am very pleased with these comments as not only I need to learn; I also need to show what I learnt through my learning log and reflection. I am glad I am doing it right.

My James Turrell contextual study showed what I learnt about light and framing views. It also showed how I applied that new knowledge to different interior spaces, and I was ‘referencing it back and forth’ – which will ‘enrich my future design work.’

To improve my work:

I should improve my drawing skills by practising as much as I can, quick 10-minute sketches of random views of spaces and objects I observe.

Life drawing practice would help me understand the proportions of human body better. Free online classes were recommended by my tutor as well as OCA workshops (that I signed up for already).

My tutor said not to be too careful with it, just to follow through even if it does not look right it will all fall into place.

I am very pleased with the feedback I received, I shall follow the tips and recommendations specified in my feedback.

Assignment Four: Visualisation

I arranged some small scale figures around my model from assignment 1 and imagined the objects are rock sculptures (Fig. 1). I tried rely hardness of the material in my drawing. Due to size and weight it would most likely be an outdoor exhibition. The below drawing was completed on A3 sheet of paper paper using HB automatic pencil and precision eraser to lighten up parts that are not in shade, to increase the contrast between light and shade, and also to emphasize the hardess and sharp finish of the sculptures.

Fig. 1 Rock sculptures

Then I decided that my model could also make a nice stool, made of foam wrapped in rough, off white wool fabric. I tried to rely the softness of the structure in my drawing again using play of light and shade but this time more toned. The bases of my stools would be made of wood. In my visual I drew a person sitting on one of the stools and looking at the artwork to clearly indicate function of the object. I placed the stools inside a small art gallery, the interior shape is inspired by my models. The walls and dome ceiling are clad in light plywood. I selected this material because it is light, cosy and simple. It will not take attention away from the art displayed. I inserted a strip of windows near the top of the dome to engulf the interior in natural light. The floor is covered in simple wooden planks (Fig. 2). I completed this drawing using pencil, felt tip pens, fine liners, and soft pastels. I am hoping I managed to capture movement in the shape of the room and repetition of pattern on the walls.

Fig. 2 Interior visual

Then I decided to draw the actual buildings of the gallery (Fig. 3). There would be three of them as there are three objects in my model. I would like them to be positioned in an open green space. The shapes of the buildings are unusual but finished in limited materials of CorTen (weathered steel) and clear glass. I think CorTen’s colour and matt texture would contrast dramatically with the greenery around. The shiny glass in the stripes of skylights and doorways will on the other hand contrast with CorTen, adding interest to my buildings. Also, the top of the dome, floating like a hat above the rest of the building and glass stripe was my idea of adding movement to the exterior design.

Fig. 3 Outside visual

Reflection on completing the Assignment Four and Part Four:

The drawing exercises in Part Four were useful, especially the tonal ones. They really helped get the texture of rock sculptures in Fig. 1 of my Assignment 4.

I thoroughly enjoyed all drawing exercises, I just like drawing, even if I am not very good at it.

Exercise 1.1 opened my eyes to different techniques giving different results, not sure if blind drawing or drawing with eyes closed would get me far… I was most pleased with the result of tonal drawing in that exercise.

I liked experimenting with media and surprising results of those experiments, especially in the drawing with fine liners on greaseproof paper. I think that was my best drawing in that exercise, it was precise and smudged at the same time. Some of the methods I tried turned out quite messy (charcoal) but I am pleased I tried them; charcoal is great for creating shade.

I purchased a set of soft pastel pencils recently and I think it is my favourite medium, you can so easily change the intensity of the tone, and rely light, shade, and colour better. But sometimes simple coloured pencils did the job too, it made me realise that we do not always have to use complicated methods, sometimes drawing may be in a spur of a moment, and then any medium could suffice.

Doing collage was fun, I embraced the creative process and tried to find the most unobvious pieces to paste. Also learning how to use photoshop for the first time was great, still way to go with learning it, but I enjoyed the start.

Contextual studies as usual were extensive and time consuming, but I learnt a lot from them. How to look at the interior and try to see movement: what an abstract task, yet it is a doable activity, it just needed some imagination. I enjoyed looking at different interiors and selecting the ‘ones’ I did. My favourite one was Opium Pop Up Store (The Flip Flop) – its interior screams movement (and lines). Polet Restaurant Interior would be a good example in truth to materials exercise in Part Three, most materials are natural and bare.

Contextual Study: Light was difficult. It was easy to find images of James Turrell’s work, but it was hard to answer the questions. I needed a few days to dwell and few nights to sleep on it before the answers came to me. Light and shade are to capture movement and atmosphere of the space. Also, without the light we could not see.  James Turrell’s work and philosophy were coming back to me when completing the Assignment Four, the study inspired the stripes of skylights in Fig. 2 and Fig.3.

Capturing Movement drawing exercise was a real pleasure. I may not be the best at drawing people, and I’m not sure if opting for opaque figures is the way to go but I really enjoyed exploring the options on how to capture different movements I saw, how to make them move while being in a still drawing. I hope I got it right. I think to capture movement you need pattern and contrast.

20 second renders were not easy; I think the only one I remotely managed to capture was marble. The following render exercise was not easier, despite having more time and a selection of different drawing materials. Some cubes took more than one drawing trial. I think sometimes it will be better to use software to render or to annotate drawings by hand to specify the finish or material.

One-point perspective drawing was quite easy compared with two-point perspective. I enjoyed both exercises and since completing it I try to look and see I can pinpoint vanishing points in two-point perspective views. I took the photo in Fig. 4 as an example of two-point perspective view when we can see corner(s) of building(s). I would usually stop and look and see if my eyes can follow the invisible guidelines to find the vanishing point.

Fig. 4 Two-point perspective.

I struggled capturing perspective in my Assignment Four. I blame my unskilled hand and the fact the objects are circular. I am also hoping I am too harsh on myself and maybe it is not as bad as I think.

Looking back at my perspective with tone and colour I think the one without colour relies atmosphere and light and shade better. This exercise made me practice noticing the play of light and shade, and I am hoping I was successful utilising this skill when completing drawing in Fig. 1 of my assignment 4.

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